Coming together…sharing experiences, strength, and hope

A Different Level of Care

Eagle Overlook Recovery for Adolescents promotes the well-being of our clients, their family unit, current wellness and recovery, and their future goals. we assist our clients in embarking on the process of self-actualization through identifying their strengths, likes, dislikes, and opportunities for improvement. .Our team strives to help our clients develop exciting lifestyle alternatives to the treacherous road of substance use disorder and/or dependence.  Our philosophy is to ignite passions that have been latent so as to help foster a life with purpose and exuberance.

Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Eagle Overlook Recovery for Adolescents specializes in the unique challenges adolescents encounter and the direct relationship between their experiences and co- occurring disorders. Individuals vary in reasons and intensity of substance use. We have the unique ability to intervene and treat the disorder of addiction during these important years of growth and development.

Art and Music Programming:

Music and art are increasingly being used as tools for therapy for high school students who have faced trauma — from sexual abuse to homelessness — and have been proven to help students cope, both physically and psychologically.

Music and art are increasingly being used as tools for therapy for high school students who have faced trauma, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and substance use disorder/dependence.  They have been proven to help students cope, both physically and psychologically.Studies have shown that participating in music and art can alleviate pain, help people manage stress, promote wellness, enhance memory, improve communications, aide physical rehabilitation, and give people a way to express their feelings.
Music has the same effect on the brain as the smell of lavender and chamomile, which produce “feel-good” chemicals like dopamine. A 2011 study conducted by researchers from McGill University in Montreal found that music plays a significant role in causing a good mood. It showed that dopamine levels were 9% higher in participants who had listened to music they enjoyed.

Wilderness and Experiential Programming

Wilderness therapy also referred to as outdoor behavioral healthcare, is a treatment modality that uses expeditions into the wilderness or other unfamiliar surroundings as a means of addressing behavioral and mental health issues. Though wilderness therapy represents a small subset of adventure-based therapy and broader wilderness experience programs, the approach has its own distinct characteristics. Older individuals may participate in wilderness therapy programs; however, the approach is primarily geared toward treating at-risk adolescents and young adults.

HOW WILDERNESS THERAPY WORKS

Wilderness therapy provides a secure, non-critical, and supportive environment for self-discovery. Individuals who find a therapist and engage in wilderness therapy are often guided through an examination of maladaptive behaviors that contribute to negative circumstances in their lives. Through the use of wilderness expeditions, primitive skills training (such as primitive fire starting), and team-building exercises, disruptive or unproductive beliefs and views may be challenged and possibly transformed.

Wilderness therapy is modeled to mimic the challenges and pressures found within family and social structures but delivers them in an atmosphere free from negative influences. Youths learn how to develop healthy relationships, live within boundaries, and accept and process feedback while relying on their own sense of inner wisdom and strength. Additionally, participants are often required to forge alliances with other youths for self-preservation or task completion. By doing this, the participants develop self-confidence, communication skills, cooperative skills, and trust.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) & Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT):

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychological treatment that has been demonstrated to be effective for a range of problems including depression, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders (in adults and adolescents,) marital problems, eating disorders and severe mental illness. Numerous research studies suggest that CBT leads to significant improvement in functioning and quality of life. In many studies, CBT has been demonstrated to be as effective as, or more effective than, other forms of psychological therapy or psychiatric medications. It is important to emphasize that advances in CBT have been made on the basis of both research and clinical practice. Indeed, CBT is an approach for which there is ample scientific evidence that the methods that have been developed produce change. In this manner, CBT differs from many other forms of psychological treatment.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a counseling method often used to treat maladaptive behaviors by assisting the client in resolving ambivalent feelings and insecurities to find the internal motivation they need to change their behavior. It is a practical, empathetic, and short-term process that takes into consideration how difficult it is to make life changes.

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT)

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) is a short-term form of psychotherapy that helps you identify self-defeating thoughts and feelings, challenge the rationality of those feelings, and replace them with healthier, more productive beliefs. REBT focuses mostly on the present time to help you understand how unhealthy thoughts and beliefs create emotional distress which, in turn, leads to unhealthy actions and behaviors that interfere with your current life goals. Once identified and understood, negative thoughts and actions can be changed and replaced with more positive and productive behavior, allowing you to develop more successful personal and professional relationships.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT):

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) provides clients with new skills to manage painful emotions and decrease conflict in relationships. DBT specifically focuses on providing therapeutic skills in four key areas. First, mindfulness focuses on improving an individual’s ability to accept and be present in the current moment. Second, distress tolerance is geared toward increasing a person’s tolerance of negative emotion, rather than trying to escape from it. Third, emotion regulation covers strategies to manage and change intense emotions that are causing problems in a person’s life. Fourth, interpersonal effectiveness consists of techniques that allow a person to communicate with others in a way that is assertive, maintains self-respect, and strengthens relationships.

Psychoeducation Group Therapy: (PGT)

A psychoeducational group is a group therapy group conducted by a mental health professional that educates clients about their disorders and ways of coping. Psychoeducational groups utilize the group therapy process, where clients share their concerns and struggle with recovery with the group and facilitator comparable to other substance use disorder groups. However, a key difference with psychoeducational groups compared to substance use disorder therapy groups is the injection of materials to help convey significant information to the clients.

 
The introduction of materials into the psychoeducational group helps to make the group not only a safe place for clients to process their feelings and struggles, but it adds a strong educational component. Some of the material used in a psychoeducational group include sheets with statistical information, videos, handouts, books, curriculum, and even guest speakers. These materials enable the client to see statistics, see written examples, read about others’ recovery details, have materials to study, and see other people sharing their stories including their ups, downs, consequences, and triumphs of recovery. These materials help to increase participant’s self-awareness of their choices. Psychoeducational groups help the counselor have a topic with an agenda including activities. These groups are particularly valuable because they can provide resources that may aid in recovery, knowledge related to their affliction, and information to become more self-aware of the consequences of their condition. Our groups include, like skills, coping skills, defense mechanism, consequences of substance use, relapse prevention, community support systems, “releasing anger” 12-step base group, warning signs and symptoms of depression.

A psychoeducational group is a group therapy group conducted by a mental health professional that educates clients about their disorders and ways of coping. Psychoeducational groups utilize the group therapy process, where clients share their concerns and struggle with recovery with the group and facilitator comparable to other substance abuse groups. However, a key difference with psychoeducational groups compared to substance abuse therapy groups is the injection of materials to help convey significant information to the clients.

The introduction of materials into the psychoeducational group helps to make the group not only a safe place for clients to process their feelings and struggles, but it adds a strong educational component. Some of the material used in a psychoeducational group include sheets with statistical information, videos, handouts, books, curriculum, and even guest speakers. These materials enable the client to see statistics, see written examples, read about others’ recovery details, have materials to study, and see other people sharing their stories including their ups, downs, consequences, and triumphs of recovery. These materials help to increase participant’s self-awareness of their choices. Psychoeducational groups help the counselor have a topic with an agenda including activities. These groups are particularly valuable because they can provide resources that may aid in recovery, knowledge related to their affliction, and information to become more self-aware to the consequences of their condition. Our groups include, life skills, coping skills, defense mechanism, consequences of substance use, relapse prevention, community support systems, “releasing anger” 12-step base group, warning signs and symptoms of depression.

Spirituality and Pathways to Recovery

Spirituality can mean different things to different people. For some, it’s primarily about participation in organized religion. For others, it’s a non-religious experience that involves getting in touch with their spiritual selves through yoga, meditation, quiet reflection, or time in nature. Instincts toward spirituality appear to be deeply ingrained in individuals. People can’t help but ask “big questions”—“is there a God?” Does He know I exist?” “Is there someone or something bigger than me that cares ?” Research shows that even declared skeptics can’t stifle a sense that there is something greater than the physical world.  As the brain processes sensory experiences, it naturally looks for patterns—and people’s conscious selves often seek meaning in those patterns. This can lead to the phenomenon known as “cognitive dissonance,” which describes how once one believes in something, one is strongly inclined to try to explain away anything that conflicts with it. Cognitive dissonance is not unique to religion or spirituality but often occurs in the context of such beliefs. We have simple reasoning behind spirituality vs. faith-based initiatives in treatment. We believe that growing spiritually is the foundation for understanding a relationship with one’s self and one’s mental health and well-being.  We follow a 12-step based approach and provide an atmosphere of spiritual growth and recovery for young people. We are open to multiple pathways but specialize in the 12 steps and practicing the principles behind each of them.

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP):

EAP is effective on its own or in conjunction with talk therapy. The use of horses is gaining more recognition as a powerful and effective approach to helping children, adolescents, and adults.  Those who are familiar with horses recognize and understand the power of horses to influence people in incredibly powerful ways.  Horses are innate at reading our non-verbal body language, experience a wide range of feelings, provide immediate, honest, observable feedback in response to our interactions with them.  Horses are sensitive to nonverbal stimuli, which makes them astute guides. They are social beings and bring insight into group dynamics and the individual roles we play in our daily lives.  EAP an action-based therapy in which individuals learn about themselves and others by participating in activities with horses followed by a discussion concerning their feelings, behaviors, and patterns.  The focus of EAP is not riding or horsemanship. The focus of EAP involves activities with horses that require the individual or group to apply certain skills such as non-verbal communication, assertiveness, creative thinking and problem solving, leadership, work, taking responsibility, teamwork and relationships, confidence, and positive attitude. 

Why horses?

The use of horses is gaining more recognition as a powerful and effective approach to helping children, adolescents, and adults.  Those who are familiar with horses recognize and understand the power of horses to influence people in incredibly powerful ways. Horses are innate at reading our non-verbal body language, experience a wide range of feelings, provide immediate, honest, observable feedback in response to our interactions with them.  Horses are sensitive to nonverbal stimuli, which makes them astute guides. They are social beings and bring insight into group dynamics and the individual roles we play in our daily lives.

 
Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) is an emerging field in which horses are used as tools for emotional growth and learning.  It’s an action-based therapy in which individuals learn about themselves and others by participating in activities with horses followed by a discussion concerning their feelings, behaviors, and patterns.  The focus of EAP is not riding or horsemanship. The focus of EAP involves activities with horses that require the individual or group to apply certain skills such as non-verbal communication, assertiveness, creative thinking and problem solving, leadership, work, taking responsibility, teamwork and relationships, confidence, and positive attitude.
 
EAP is a brief approach that successfully addresses a variety of mental health needs including behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, substance use disorder, eating disorders, abuse issues, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, and communication needs.

Horticulture

Horticultural therapy techniques are employed to assist participants to learn new skills or regain those that are lost. Horticultural therapy helps improve memory, cognitive abilities, task initiation, language skills, and socialization. In physical rehabilitation, horticultural therapy can help strengthen muscles and improve coordination, balance, and endurance. In vocational horticultural therapy settings, people learn to work independently, problem-solve, and follow directions. Horticultural therapists are professionals with specific education, training, and credentials in the use of horticultural therapy and rehabilitation. Read the formal definition of the role of horticultural therapists

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